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06 April 2012 @ 06:45 pm
Fitt 3 Stanza 3  


Þus layke3 þis lorde by lynde wode3 eue3,
Thus leapt this lord about the woods' limber eves.

& G. þe god mon, in gay bed lyge3,
& the good man Gawain in a gay bed lies,

Lurkke3 quyl þe day-ly3t lemed on þe wowes,
Lurks, while the light of day illuminates walls,

Vnder couertour ful clere, cortyned aboute;
Under colorful covers with curtains about.

& as in slomeryng he slode, sle3ly he herde
& as he slid through his slumber, slyly he heard

A littel dyn at his dor, & derfly vpon;
A little din at his door & it deftly opened.

& he heue3 vp his hed out of þe cloþes,
& he heaves his head up out of the bedclothes,

A corner of þe cortyn he ca3t vp a lyttel,
He coerces a corner of the curtain up a little

& wayte3 warly þider-warde, quat hit be my3t.
& watches warily thitherward for what it might be.

Hit wat3 þe ladi, loflyest to be-holde,
It was the lady, loveliest to behold,

Þat dro3 þe dor after hir ful dernly & stylle,
That drew the door after her, stealthy & still,

& bo3ed to-warde þe bed; & þe burne schamed.
& turned toward the bed. The baron then blushed

& layde hym doun lystyly, & let as he slepte.
& lay down lightly & let on as he slept.

& ho stepped stilly. & stel to his bedde,
& she stepped stilly & stole to his bed,

Kest vp þe cortyn, & creped with-inne,
Cast up the curtain & crept within

& set hir ful softly on þe bed-syde,
& seated herself softly on the bedside

& lenged þere selly longe, to loke quen he wakened.
& lingered there a long time to look when he awakened.

Þe lede lay lurked a ful longe quyle,
The lord lay lurking a good long while,

Compast in his concience to quat þat cace my3t
Compassed in his conscience as to what this case

Mene oþer amount, to meruayle hym þo3t;
Might mean or amount to. "A marvel," he thought.

Bot 3et he sayde in hym-self, " more semly hit were
But yet he said to himself, "It were more seemly

To aspye wyth my spelle [in] space quat ho wolde. "
To expose with a spell of speech what she wished."

þen he wakenede, & wroth, & to hir warde torned,
Then he awakened & writhed & towards her turned

& vn-louked his y3e-lydde3, & let as hym wondered,
& unlocked his eyelids & let on as in wonder

& sayned hym, as bi his sa3e þe sauer to worthe,
& signed himself, as if by his swearing, the safer his soul from

        with hande;
        the sight.

    Wyth chynne & cheke ful swete,
    With chin & cheeks of rose,

    Boþe quit & red in-blande,
    A blend both red & white,

    Ful lufly con ho lete,
    From lovely lips there flows

    Wyth lyppe3 smal la3ande.
    Small laughs with great delight.


 
 
 
Mark E. Phairistgut on April 10th, 2012 06:00 am (UTC)
Lucy! You've got some splainin to doooo!

But seriously, what % of middle english works involve adultery or at least sex on the sly? It seems like it was present in like 50% of the cantebury tales...